Wave Series wines from CARMEN 1850 are inspired by our respect and admiration for Chile's South Pacific Coast. The Pacific Ocean strongly influences the cool climate of our Leyda Valley vineyards, and over millions of years, has helped shape the geography of the valley.

Carmen’s chief winemaker, Sebastián Labbé, who admitted that Wave was designed to attract consumers of New Zealand wines such as Oyster Bay, Villa Maria and Brancott Estate.

 

Wave Series Winemaker Sebastian Labbe

“My passion for wave riding started when I was 10. I started windsurfing in Chile very young thanks my parents’ influence. Four years later I began surfing, first in Chile, then in Wellington, New Zealand, where I lived for several years.”

Although born in Chile, Labbé moved to New Zealand when he was 19 and studied Viticulture and Oenology at Lincoln University in Christchurch, before working at Margrain Vineyard in Martinborough & Tyrrells Wines, Hunter Valley Australia.

Comparing Wave Sauvignon Blanc to similarly-priced wines from New Zealand, he said that his new wine used grapes from Leyda, which is slightly warmer than Marlborough, and as a result, Wave has a slightly richer texture than an equivalent from New Zealand’s most famous source of Sauvignon.

He also said that the aromatic grapefruit character evident in the Wave Sauvignon was achieved by adopting winemaking practises learnt in New Zealand.

“We ferment the grapes at low temperatures [from 12-16 degrees Celsius] using two yeast strains, which is something I picked up when I was working in New Zealand,” he said.

“Just like winemaking, surfing has been my way to connect with nature. Being surrounded by a fluid element teaches you humility, to take care of the natural resources, and to enjoy the ride of life. In front of the immensity of the oceans, we are all just human. It inspires me and reminds me of simple things in life.”

As a result, Wave comprises just two wines, a Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir from Leyda made in a crisp, relatively light-bodied and unoaked style, with modern and simple packaging.

Leyda Valley, Chile

Comparing Wave Sauvignon Blanc to similarly-priced wines from New Zealand, he said that his new wine used grapes from Leyda, which is slightly warmer than Marlborough, and as a result, Wave has a slightly richer texture than an equivalent from New Zealand’s most famous source of Sauvignon.

He also said that the aromatic grapefruit character evident in the Wave Sauvignon was achieved by adopting winemaking practises learnt in New Zealand.

“We ferment the grapes at low temperatures [from 12-16 degrees Celsius] using two yeast strains, which is something I picked up when I was working in New Zealand,” he said..

Furthermore, he emphasised the importance of a gentle pressing for Sauvignon-based wines. “We use a ‘Champagne Cycle’ and increase the pressure very slowly so we extend the length of the pressing cycle, but in small increments, and that is essential to the quality of Sauvignon Blanc.”

  • Several important critics have rated this Leyda Valley wine highly: Decanter World Wine Awards gave the 2015 vintage a score of 92.
  • Numerous prizes have been won by this wine: the Decanter World Wine Awards awarded the 2015 Silver and the International Wine Challenge awarded the 2014 vintage Bronze.
  • Many stores in America have this wine. At the start of this month an assortment of vintages between 2013 and 2016 were available.
  • James Suckling gave the Pinot Noir & Sauvignon Blanc 2016 a score of 90 points,

Discover Wave Series Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir

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